Microaggressions, calling out, giving power and eating our young:

Why how we treat Suey Park might matter more than her campaign to cancel Colbert You may be bored by now with the #CancelColbert controversy. I was bored with it before it became a media sensation. And yet here I am, because I just found out that Suey Park is 23, and that turned everythingContinue reading “Microaggressions, calling out, giving power and eating our young:”

The cost of being reasonable: reflections on why the whole church didn’t preach about Michael Dunn and Jordan Davis

I have some really smart friends. I have friends who are powerful leaders and facilitators and great thinkers. I have friends from all across the nation (and a few around the globe). I have friends of a fair few religious backgrounds, from Atheist to Zoroastrian. And I have friends from a whole lot of differentContinue reading “The cost of being reasonable: reflections on why the whole church didn’t preach about Michael Dunn and Jordan Davis”

Culture Clash: Why We (People of Color) Get Stuck At “They’re Bad.”

note: I’m doing a different one on POC and White people later. If you’re White, you’re welcome to eavesdrop, but let me get schooled by people of color this time around. You’ll get your turn to school me later. 🙂   I walked into my sophomore dorm room to see my college roommate sitting onContinue reading “Culture Clash: Why We (People of Color) Get Stuck At “They’re Bad.””

Race Identity as accountability, not escape: reflections from a light-skinned anti-racist

I still feel a little silly when I get to the point in an anti-racism training where I say “I’m a victim of racism.” I think there’s two reasons for this: 1)      Most people of color shaped by American society have a pretty big stake in either “I made it on my own merits despiteContinue reading “Race Identity as accountability, not escape: reflections from a light-skinned anti-racist”

On Disciples of Christ Resolution No. 0319 (Sense-of-th e-Assembly), “ON ASSURING CIVIL LIBERTIES AND EQUAL JUSTICE TO IMMIGRANT COMMUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES”

Martha stood all of 4’11”. This was twelve years back, but she already trembled slightly with age.   I was in my 20s and prone to histrionics which looked like righteous indignation to the casual observer.   Well, I was in my 20s and more prone to histrionics which may have been righteous indignation inContinue reading “On Disciples of Christ Resolution No. 0319 (Sense-of-th e-Assembly), “ON ASSURING CIVIL LIBERTIES AND EQUAL JUSTICE TO IMMIGRANT COMMUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES””

Systemic Fat Bias—is that a thing? (The complicated layers of race and gender that make it MAYBE a thing but also not)

(editorial addition: I forgot–part of what inspired this post was a spoken word that in four very blunt minutes captures what this blog fumblingly approaches addressing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxgpCfPqQpk) I remember the first online dating profile I ever posted, in 2004, while I was in seminary. It was on Nerve (don’t judge—it was “for the thinking hedonist,” ifContinue reading “Systemic Fat Bias—is that a thing? (The complicated layers of race and gender that make it MAYBE a thing but also not)”

Code switching, hipster racism and inter-POC cultural misappropriation. (or, Aren’t you glad I didn’t get braids with extensions when I was 19?)

When I was 19 or so, I thought about getting braids. Braids with extensions. Braids with beads on the ends. “African Braids.” “You’d look like a poser,” my mother said, and that was the end of that. (Admittedly, if that HADN’T been the end of that, further research into the cost of getting braids putContinue reading “Code switching, hipster racism and inter-POC cultural misappropriation. (or, Aren’t you glad I didn’t get braids with extensions when I was 19?)”

On cruising and colonialism and Christian ideas of community

I’ve learned a few things on my cruise of Greece and Turkey so far: 1) Much of the area that we call Athens is actually 43 distinct municipalities. 2) The national drink of Turkey is Raki (thus confirming the argument my parents’ Libyan friend in the 1960s consistently made that the Q’uran prohibits getting intoxicated,Continue reading “On cruising and colonialism and Christian ideas of community”

“Some people forget they were born up a close.” Why we tell our stories how we tell our stories

My mother watches me put my tea back in the microwave after it’s grown cold–a disgusting habit to her mind. “Well, you come by it honestly,” she shrugs. “Your father will make a cup of tea and sit down in his study, playing on his computer, and he’ll pick up the tea an hour laterContinue reading ““Some people forget they were born up a close.” Why we tell our stories how we tell our stories”

The perpetual foreigner and the self-perpetuating stereotype

I was talking recently with a guy I’m dating. He mentioned that he had been dreaming about flying alongside a truck, and waving at the truck driver who just looked at him funny. “Probably just the sound of traffic filtering into your dream,” I said unromantically. Undeterred in his desire to have a deep andContinue reading “The perpetual foreigner and the self-perpetuating stereotype”